What's Happenin'

A Sidelines blog

Classic Company Acquires Sidelines Magazine

January 26, 2016 By: Editor Category: What's Happenin'

Bob Bell, Samantha Charles and Bradley Spragg

Bob Bell, Samantha Charles and Bradley Spragg

Bob Bell has announced that he and Bradley Spragg of Classic Publishing, a division of Classic Company Ltd, have acquired Sidelines magazine. Bell will serve as president and Spragg will act as publisher for the magazine. Sidelines is an equestrian-focused publication that has been often referred to as “Peoplemagazine” of the horse world.  The publication and website feature the personalities and competitions central to the horsey set.

For decades Bell has produced top hunter/jumper horse shows in the southeast. His popular events include shows in Gulfport, Mississippi; Pensacola, Florida;

Atlanta and Charleston. He has been in discussions with former Sidelines owner Samantha Charles since late August and is pleased with the prospect of the new venture.

“I am ready to start working on a new chapter of my life,” said Bell. “The acquisition of Sidelines means working with my friend Bradley (Spragg) and working within a sport for which I have a great passion, I think this will be fun.”

Spragg is a friend of Bell and a successful trainer in Atlanta. He looks forward to working on the publication.

“Horses, people and style have always been my true passion,” said Spragg. “I am very excited to have the opportunity to combine them in this adventure in journalism.”

Charles developed the magazine 28 years ago. She is thrilled with the acquisition and believes the team of Bell and Spragg will take the magazine to the next level.

“I am so excited, I keep pinching myself,” Charles shared. “After starting this business and running it for 28 years, you can imagine how attached and emotionally invested I am, so it was difficult to think of passing it on to anyone who wouldn’t love Sidelines as I have and understand its potential.”

Bell and Charles have worked together for many years. “I just love Bob’s enthusiasm about the horse world,” Charles said.  “He is connected, totally invested in and is an integral part of the horse show world. He is the perfect leader; a person everyone loves and respects. I am very lucky and so is Sidelines.

Rolex 2015 a Success for New Vocations Racehorse Adoption Program

May 01, 2015 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

Dan James of Double Dan Horsemanship gave a demonstration during the New Vocations Racehorse Adoption Program even at the 2015 Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event. (Photo credit: Jan Westmark)

Dan James of Double Dan Horsemanship gave a demonstration during the New Vocations Racehorse Adoption Program event at the 2015 Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event.
(Photo credit: Jan Westmark)

April 30 Lexington, KY – New Vocations Racehorse Adoption Program once again had a successful Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event experience, with a constantly busy booth in the trade fair, a large Thoroughbred-centric event at the conclusion of the dressage on Friday, and an open house on Sunday morning before the showjumping began.

The New Vocations’ booth at Rolex sold over 550 T-shirts, hoodies, sweatshirts and cadet jackets throughout the weekend, encouraging OTTB aficionados show their love of the breed. The rain ponchos were also a hot commodity as the weather on Saturday left a lot to be desired.

A New Vocations Racehorse Adoption Program sweatshirt. (Photo credit: Jan Westmark)

A New Vocations Racehorse Adoption Program sweatshirt.
(Photo credit: Jan Westmark)

For the fourth consecutive year, the organization partnered with the Retired Racehorse Project (RRP) on Friday evening to host Thoroughbreds For All, an event that celebrates the athletic ability of Thoroughbreds in second careers. AmWest Entertainment, Wild Aire Farm and Gulfstream Park Thoroughbred After-care were co-sponsors of the event.

Beginning with a delicious Southern-style dinner, the event opened with six horses being brought into the arena in-hand for a conformation and pedigree analysis by Dr. Stuart Brown of Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, Steuart Pittman, president of the RRP, and Nuno Santos, former jockey and owner of Santos Sport Horses.

Next up was a powerhouse clinician lineup including Laine Ashker, a regular competitor at Rolex Kentucky CCI**** and rider of the magnificent off-track Thoroughbred Anthony Patch; international dressage high-performance rider, trainer, coach and clinician Reese Koffler-Stanfield; and world-class colt trainer and winner of both the 2014 Kentucky Reining Cup and the 2014 All-American Quarter Horse Congress Freestyle Reining Dan James of Double Dan Horsemanship.

Reese gave clinic-style demonstrations  to New Vocations graduates Monopolize, a 2015 Thoroughbred Makeover entrant ridden by Julie Hall, and Dundee, ridden by Dr. Jill Stowe. Both horses are at different stages in their dressage careers, so the crowd was able to learn how Reese brings them along, as well as how she adjusts her training techniques between Warmbloods and Thoroughbreds.

The next guests, Laine Ashker, and mom Valerie Ashker, gave a fantastic flat work and gymnastic clinic to two other Makeover contestants, Emily Daignault-Salvaggio on Gin Joint and Jordan Pruiksma on Fullback.

To round out the evening, Dan James gave a fantastic liberty demonstration with his own horses, then explained to the crowd how he begins desensitizing the horses to both crowd noises and the whip. New Vocations’ adoptable horse One Brave Warrior was the demo horse, and soon was not even blinking when the whip was swung around his head or cracked!In between demonstrations, the Jockey Club Thoroughbred Incentive Program recognized Rolex riders on OTTBs, including Laine Ashker (Anthony Patch), Dana Widstrand (Relentless Pursuit) and Katie Ruppel (Houdini).New Vocations finished off the weekend with an open house that showcased some of their adoptable Thoroughbreds; guests were also able to speak with staff members and ask questions of the trainers. This event was hosted in conjunction with the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ (ASPCA) national Help A Horse Day, where New Vocations will compete for a chance to win up to $10,000 in grant prizes to assist with their efforts in rehabilitating, retraining and rehoming ex-racehorses.

New Vocations Racehorse Adoption Program

Founded in 1992, New Vocations has become the largest racehorse adoption program in the country and has facilities in Ohio, Pennsylvania and Kentucky. The program’s mission is to rehab, retrain and rehome retired racehorses. In 2014, the program took in over 450 retired racehorses. Working directly with owners and trainers who need aftercare for horses leaving the track, the program currently receives horses from more than 30 racetracks. New Vocations has a sound adoption system that is proven to move a large number of horses in a relatively short period of time. The program focuses on adoption rather than retirement, believing that each horse deserves to have an individual home and purpose. www.newvocations.org

Danny & Ron’s Rescue Gives Back

April 30, 2015 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

Danny & Ron's Rescue Gives Back 2
Donates $10,000 to Meals On Wheels of the Palm Beaches

Wellington, FL – April 30, 2015 – The crowd was on their feet, and shouts resounded through the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center as Danny & Ron’s Rescue was announced as the 2015 Great Charity Challenge winners that fateful night in February. They were presented with the top prize, a check for $150,000. Still on cloud nine, Danny Robertshaw and Ron Danta, the founders of Danny & Ron’s Rescue, said to one another, “We definitely want to give some of this money back to the community!” – and so they have. Danny & Ron’s Rescue is pleased to announced that they have donated $10,000 to Animeals on Wheels, an extension of the Meals on Wheels of the Palm Beaches, Inc.

Giving back to the local community is one of the pillars that Danny & Ron’s Rescue adheres to. In just one of their most recent charitable acts, Danny & Ron’s donated $10,000 to Meals on Wheels of the Palm Beaches, Inc. The money will be used for the Animeals on Wheels program, which provides pet food and veterinary care to home-bound residents with dogs or cats.

Director of Volunteer Services Debbie Emerick, Chief Operating Officer Pam Calzadilla and Executive Director Kim Tudor of Danny & Ron's Rescue with 5-month-old Sadie Mae. (Photo credit: Kendall Bierer/Phelps Media Group)

Director of Volunteer Services Debbie Emerick, Chief Operating Officer Pam Calzadilla and Executive Director Kim Tudor of Danny & Ron’s Rescue
with 5-month-old Sadie Mae. (Photo credit: Kendall Bierer/Phelps Media Group)

“Danny and I are always looking for ways to assist the residents of our community, so we are pleased for this opportunity to partner with Meals on Wheels of the Palm Beaches. We read about the Animeals Program and knew right away that we wanted to help Meals on Wheels to provide home-bound seniors and disabled persons with veterinary care and food for their pets,” Ron said. “These people live alone, and all too often their only visitor is the Meals on Wheels volunteer who delivers a hot meal. So we want to make sure that their beloved pet companions are cared for, as well.”

Meals on Wheels of the Palm Beaches provides freshly prepared meals five days a week to residents in the in West Palm Beach area, the downtown Lake Worth area and surrounding vicinities.  Animeals on Wheels is a natural extension of that service. For many home-bound residents, their pet is their only companion. The Animeals program was initially funded through a $2,500 donation from the Banfield Charitable Foundation.

“When Kim [Tudor] of Danny & Ron’s Rescue called me to talk about the Animeals program, after reading the article in the Wellington Town Crier, I never imagined the blessing that we would receive,” Debbie Emerick, Director of Volunteer Services, said. “When she told us that they were going to donate $10,000 I couldn’t stop screaming, ‘You’re kidding? Oh my gosh! You’re kidding!’ I was in disbelief.”

The donated money will act as a huge help for Animeals on Wheels, assisting with the large veterinary costs associated with not only owning pets, but also maintaining their health as they continue to age.

“Many of our home-bound senior clients who live alone depend on their pets for companionship but providing food and veterinary care while living on a limited income can be a challenge,” said Charlie Ring, executive director of Meals on Wheels of the Palm Beaches. “Through our new Animeals program we’re able to help relieve some of the burden on our clients who love and care about their cats and dogs so deeply.”

For Danny & Ron’s Rescue, the chance to add $150,000 to their support of needy animals this year has been a dream come true, yet they wanted to allow the money to go a little bit further. At their home in Wellington, Florida, Danta and Robertshaw have worked with local veterinarians and organizations to build sustainable relationships and partnerships that assist the elderly and their animals. Seeing Animeals on Wheels taking its first steps in Palm Beach County is the perfect match for Danny & Ron’s Rescue, and they hope to continue building on that relationship.

Danny & Ron’s Rescue saw this as a valuable way to use part of their winnings and improve the lives of both people and their pets in their local community. Currently, the Animeals program is free for clients enrolled in Meals on Wheels of the Palm Beaches, and is expected to grow exponentially as part of the organization’s five-year plan.

For more information on Danny & Ron’s Rescue, please visit http://www.dannyandronsrescue.com/ or stay up to date on their Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DannyRonsRescue.

About Meals on Wheels of the Palm Beaches Meals on Wheels of the Palm Beaches is a non-profit organization dedicated to nourishing and enriching the lives of the homebound in the local community. An affiliate of Meals on Wheels America, the organization provides nutritious mid-day meals to those unable to prepare their own and living alone. A community-based organization, Meals on Wheels of the Palm Beaches relies on volunteers and the financial support of local residents, corporate partners and foundations, operating without government funding.

Don’t Miss The Deadline To Apply For USA Equestrian Trust Grants

April 29, 2015 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

USAET Logo

Equine Non-Profits Must Submit Applications by Monday, May 4

April 28, 2015 — Lexington, KY — There is still time to submit proposals for USA Equestrian Trust’s 2015 grants program. IRS-registered equine non-profits are invited to apply by filling out the online grant application at http://www.trusthorses.org.

In 2014, the Trust awarded nearly $300,000 to help fund almost 20 projects. The Trust’s financial support has been dedicated largely but not exclusively for initiatives that are productive across several national-level discipline and/or breed boundaries. The Trust welcomes proposals for need-based projects and encourages applicants to detail those in their applications.

Any organization applying must submit copies of its IRS non-profit determination letter and most recent Form 990, as well as a proposed budget for its project. The deadline to submit applications is 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time on Monday, May 4.

Funding available for grants includes $41,500 reserved for Hunter and Jumper non-profit programs and activities in California and Nevada. Applicants for this fund should make clear their intention to apply for grants available from this specific reserve.

If you have any questions about applying, please e-mail grants@trusthorses.org.

About USA Equestrian Trust

USA Equestrian Trust is a New York Not-for-Profit Corporation whose mission is to assist in preserving and/or enhancing the quality of equestrian sport in the United States of America. Its objects and purposes are exclusively charitable, educational and dedicated to the fostering of equestrian sports. The Trust is a private foundation pursuant to the United States Internal Revenue Code.

8th Annual Pet a Pony Day

April 28, 2015 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

Photo by Barbara Bays

Photo by Barbara Bays

8th Annual Pet a Pony Day, sponsored by M&M Tack Shop

When: Weds. June 24, 2015, 9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Where:  Gov. James B. Hunt Horse Complex, 4601 Trinity Rd. Raleigh NC 27607
(Across the street from Carter-Finley Stadium)

What:  Pet real ponies; learn about horse health and horse care; watch show jumping  and watch a farrier at work.

  • Petting ponies courtesy of the North Carolina Horse Council and Shepherd Youth Ranch
  • Farrier demonstrations at 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00 courtesy of Joey Hite, Certified Journeyman Farrier
  • Horse health display and staff courtesy of the NCSU School of Veterinary Medicine Student Chapter of the American Association of Equine Practitioners
Photo by Cyndi Peterson

Photo by Cyndi Peterson

Cost:  Admission and parking are free

Pet a Pony Day is a feature event of the North Carolina Hunter Jumper Assoc. (NCHJA) Annual Horse Show.  Youngsters from the NCHJA, 4H and Pony Club serve as guides and hosts for this event, which offers fun and excitement for children of all ages.

Contact Barbara Bays bmbaysbus@gmail.com or 919-676-8293 for more information.

Website: www.nchja.com

Photo by Tory Hoft

Photo by Tory Hoft

The NCHJA Annual Horse Show takes place at the Hunt Horse Complex everyday, Weds. June 24–Sun. June 28, 2015, with special classes held Fri. and Sat. evenings.  Spectators are welcome.  Admission is free throughout the show.

High Performance Dressage Riders Passionate About Brooke USA’s Cause

April 09, 2015 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

Allison Brock and Rosevelt (Photo credit: Mary Adelaide Brakenridge)

Allison Brock and Rosevelt (Photo credit: Mary Adelaide Brakenridge)

Wellington, FL – April 8, 2015 – Grand Prix dressage riders Allison Brock and Shannon Dueck are passionate about Brooke USA, the world’s largest international equine welfare charity.

Brock, of the United States, was introduced to the charity and all that they do for working horses and donkeys by Fritz and Claudine Kundrun. She knew that it was important to bring awareness to it.

“I think Brooke USA is one of the best charities around for working horses and donkeys,” Brock said. “They actually educate people on how to take care of them, and they work towards more sustainable, long term quality care of the animal. To me it’s the best case scenario because when you help the animals the owners benefit, too.”

Brock competes at the international Grand Prix level with Rosevelt, a 13-year-old Hanoverian stallion owned by the Kundruns. She recently won team gold with USA Team 1 at the Stillpoint Farm Nations Cup CDIO3* in Wellington, Florida.

Brock is an athlete who is at the top of the high performance dressage world and her success only continues to grow. At shows, she shares information about Brooke USA to encourage others to become involved.

“I typically will have banners out and bring pamphlets,” Brock said. “I talk to people who ask about it, direct them to the website and try to raise awareness. We live in this world where our horses are taken care of better than people, and you need to balance it out a bit.”

As the Brooke’s presence continues to grow in the United States, Brock hopes that more people who learn about the charity are motivated to help. She believes that at the end of the day, horse people are passionate about helping animals, and involvement will increase as awareness of the charity spreads.

“I think awareness is going to grow and we can keep raising funds at horse shows, among other things, in the U.S.,” Brock said. “I think once people know what the charity is about, they’ll be all for it. It’s such a good cause, and the money is spent so well. People just need to know about it; horse people want to take care of horses and donkeys.”

Brooke veterinarian treats a malnourished horse who works in tourism in the Middle East www.BrookeUSA.org (Photo courtesy of Brooke USA)

Brooke veterinarian treats a malnourished horse who works in tourism in the Middle East.
(Photo courtesy of Brooke USA, www.BrookeUSA.org)

Dueck, who is also successful in the world of high performance dressage, likewise competed at the Stillpoint Farm Nations Cup CDIO3* on Canada’s Team 2, taking home the team bronze medal. Dueck said she is a “sucker for animal charities,” and she has been supporting the Brooke for around 15 years.

“They’re really helping our horses and our working equines,” Dueck said. “It also makes a difference to so many impoverished people, so it’s a win-win situation for both the animals and the people who rely on them.”

The Brooke was founded in Great Britain. Dueck, like Brock, believes the key to increasing the numbers of U.S. supporters is building awareness of the charity in the U.S., since once people understand the positive impact of the work it does, they want to be involved.

“It’s such a wonderful charity that helps on so many levels,” Dueck said. “The amount of money that goes directly to helping the animals and the people is huge, and the administrative costs are quite low. For that reason, we need the awareness out there, and I’m hoping that in the next five years everybody in my industry knows about this charity.”

Though some people may not be in a financial situation to be donating funds, donating time and knowledge is just as important, which is what Dueck hopes to do.

Brock and Dueck have both had successful winter seasons in Wellington, culminating with their appearances in the Nations Cup. Dueck was especially pleased with her performance that weekend with the 12-year-old Hanoverian gelding Cantaris, who is owned by Elizabeth Ferber.

“We got personal best scores through all of our tests and we were the starters both in the Prix St. Georges and the Intermediaire I, so we kind of had to set the bar,” Dueck said. “I was super proud; we didn’t make a mistake all weekend, so that was a very nice way to end the season. It was fantastic to end on such a high note.”

Shannon Dueck and Cantaris (Photo credit: Mary Adelaide Brakenridge)  Shannon Dueck and Cantaris, Client: Brooke USA Photo Credit: Mary Adelaide Brakenridge

Shannon Dueck and Cantaris (Photo credit: Mary Adelaide Brakenridge)

Brock was also happy with her season with Rosevelt. The pair’s two wins in Grand Prix CDI classes and consistent performances at the Adequan Global Dressage Festival established them among the top U.S. combinations. Though Brock believes Rosevelt enjoys showing, it is still important to her to maintain a balance. His wellbeing is far more important to her than winning a blue ribbon, and it is easy to see how this mindset translates to her support of the Brooke.

“I was really, really happy with my horse,” Brock said. “He is just getting better and better. Both of us needed experience, and I think I was smart to not over-show him. He was still happy to show at the end of the season, and I think that’s really important. You can take advantage of the shows, but you don’t want to overdo it. They have to want to go out there and be happy to be in that ring, and I think he was.”

The Brooke  is currently working in 11 countries across Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America, and in the last year it reached 1.5 million working horses, donkeys and mules, benefiting several million of the world’s poorest people. Brooke USA is a 501(c)(3) charity and exists solely to support the overseas work of the Brooke.

For more information about Brooke USA, please contact Cindy Rullman: 859-296-0037, Cindy.Rullman@BrookeUSA.org, or visit www.BrookeUSA.org.

Maker’s Mark Secretariat Center Partners with RunTheBluegrass to Offer Family Fun Day

April 01, 2015 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

Family fun personalizing genuine horse shoes to take home. (Photo credit: Catherine Flowers)

Family fun personalizing genuine horse shoes to take home.
(Photo credit: Catherine Flowers)

Lexington, KY. March 28, 2014 – On Saturday, March 28th, the Maker’s Mark Secretariat Center hosted runners and their families for an afternoon of fun in collaboration with RunTheBluegrass. A day of running and experiencing the best of Central Kentucky’s farms and horse parks, RunTheBluegrass offered races of various length from Kids’ One Mile to Half-Marathon.

After crossing the finish line, participants headed to the Maker’s Mark Secretariat Center for a family fun day, where they had the opportunity to paint and decorate their own genuine horseshoes, take pictures with the Secretariat statue, watch the off-the-track Thoroughbreds play in the arena, groom a horse, and even dress like a jockey.

Meeting the Maker's Mark Secretariat Center residents. (Photo credit: Catherine Flowers)

Meeting the Maker’s Mark Secretariat Center residents.
(Photo credit: Catherine Flowers)

Maker’s Mark Secretariat Center Executive Director Susanna Thomas was on hand to greet guests and join the activities. “RunTheBluegrass is a fantastic event that really showcases all the beauty that Lexington has to offer,” said Thomas. “I am so glad that the MMSC was able to partner with the race to teach participants about all the work that we do to help Thoroughbreds and to give families an enjoyable and memorable afternoon with the horses.”

About the Maker’s Mark Secretariat Center (MMSC): The Maker’s Mark Secretariat Center is a premier reschooling facility and showcase for adoptable Thoroughbreds. Founded in 2004, the MMSC uses its illustrious location in the Kentucky Horse Park to herald the athleticism of this amazing breed by teaching new skill sets to horses of all levels of ability so they can go on to be ambassadors for racehorses in new careers.

Technological Medical Advancements, LLC (TMA) and Bruce R. Coren Announces the Availability of Their Multiple High Power-High Dosage Laser Platforms to the Wellington Equine Community

February 23, 2015 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

Technological Medical Advancements, LLC (TMA) and Bruce R. Coren, DVM, MS developer of the first FDA cleared high power therapeutic laser for pain management and wound healing in both human and veterinary medicine announces the availability of their multiple high power-high dosage laser platforms to the Wellington equine community. (Photo Courtesy of Technological Medical Advancements, LLC)

For more information, contact info@diowavelaser.com or 866-883-1651

West Palm Beach, FL, February 15, 2015 – Dr. Bruce R. Coren, Cofounder and CEO of Technological Medical Advancements developer of the Diowave Laser Systems, www.diowavelaser.com, is announcing the availability of their cutting edge technology for treatment for both horse and rider.

TMA and Dr. Coren developers of the first FDA cleared high power therapeutic laser for pain management and wound healing in both human and veterinary medicine is now offering three (3) laser platforms ranging in power output from 15 to 60 watts to the Equine community. The 30 and 60-watt platforms offer the most powerful and advanced laser therapy technology in the world.

Since 2003, Dr. Coren has been a pioneer and pacesetter in the advancement of therapeutic laser therapy technology for neuro-musculoskeletal pain management and wound healing. Today, as high power laser therapy is widely recognized in the United States as a safe, pain-free and non-invasive medical procedure to accelerate the treatment and rehabilitation of various acute and chronic pain conditions, the company’s Class IV- High Power Laser Therapy (HPLT) devices are now used in hundreds of human and veterinary medical facilities throughout the United States, including prestigious medical schools such as Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell Veterinary School of Medicine, the Department of Defense, the VA System, the NCAA, NBA, NFL, MLB and all facets of small and large animal veterinary medicine. HPLT offers the ability to dramatically accelerate the recovery from all equine athlete injuries.

What differentiates the Diowave brand from all other therapy devices is that they offer the most powerful and advanced HPLT technology in the world. With higher power comes the ability to put significantly greater dosages of healing energy into every equine injury today’s owner is confronted with. According to CEO, Dr. Bruce R. Coren, the key to rapid injury recovery is the dosage and frequency of energy the horse receives. Typical therapy lasers and their protocols do not allow for adequate delivery of healing therapeutic energy. Having the availability of the laser on the farm allows for much greater frequency of treatment and ultimately leading to better and faster clinical outcomes for both horse and rider.

The mechanism of action for laser therapy comes from its ability, at the cellular level, to “bio-stimulate” tissue growth and repair. This results in accelerated wound healing as well as a dramatic decrease in pain, inflammation and scar tissue formation. Unlike all other treatment modalities, laser therapy actually “heals” tissue. Recent studies even show that laser stimulates the activation of stem cells, which are an integral part of the healing process. The Diowave brand of laser therapy works better than other lower power lasers because of the ability to penetrate significantly deeper into the body while simultaneously delivering vastly larger amounts of healing energy.

Although the technology has been around for many years it is just starting to find its way around the Wellington equestrian community. The laser can be found at several hunter jumper farms as well as with local veterinarian Haynes Stevens and physiotherapist Janus Marquis just to name a few. Recently veterinarian Omar Mahar introduced a 60-watt laser to a hunter jumper farm and the results were so impressive the farm purchased the laser.

For more information or to schedule an on-site demonstration for both horse and rider contact Dr. Bruce R. Coren, DVM, MS directly at 561-722-1153 or at bcoren@tmainternational.com.

Christmas Carriage Parade Ushers In Holiday Spirit With Equestrian Flair

December 23, 2014 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

Christmas Carriage Parade Ushers In Holiday Spirit With Equestrian Flair

By Kim MacMillan

All photos, unless otherwise noted, are by Allen and Kim MacMillan and Tammy Brown/Copyright MacMillan Photography. Photos may not be reproduced without permission. Photos are available for purchase at photo@looncreekenterprises.com or 260-468-2392.  

The historic city of Lebanon, Ohio, is magically transformed into a holiday wonderland the first Saturday in December every year when their annual Christmas carriage parade comes to town. This year was the 26th year for the Lebanon Christmas Festival and Carriage Parade. In 2014 the parade included over 100 entries from four states.

Parade entries ranged from Minis pulling small wagons up to six-horse draft teams pulling beer wagons and include many restored antique carriages and sleighs. Over 20 different breeds of horses and ponies, as well as donkeys and mules, pulled the various carriages, carts and wagons in the 2014 parade. Entries were decorated for the holidays and the drivers, passengers and grooms were dressed for the occasion, many in period costumes styled to match the antique vehicles. This year’s parade dignitaries included Santa and Mrs. Claus, the mayor of Lebanon and the Grinch, who in this case, happily, did not steal Christmas.

There are two parades each year, one right after lunch in the afternoon and another in the evening when the lanterns on the carriages and the Christmas lights lining the streets create a magical atmosphere. The entire city of Lebanon gets into the spirit with a street festival and holiday happenings including:  free horse-drawn wagon rides; tours of the historic Golden Lamb Inn and the 18th century Glendower Mansion; photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus; rides on the North Pole Express vintage train; a gingerbread house display; a Christmas play at the local theatre; “Winter Wonderland” at a local tree farm; a living nativity; breakfast with Santa; a holiday light display, and live entertainment on the downtown stage.

Sara Arseneau of the Lebanon Chamber of Commerce talked about what the carriage parade means to the residents of the area, “The Lebanon Carriage Parade and Christmas Festival is the largest all horse-drawn carriage parade in the United States and is the largest holiday kickoff in Ohio. Words just cannot describe the feeling of magic that our horsemen and these two parades bring to Lebanon.”

Nancy Jackson, the President of the Ohio Valley Carriage Club (OVCC), talked about the parade and her reasons for participating for so many years, “The parade has grown into a significant tourist event. Last year they had around 200,000 visitors. Lots of things keep me coming back to the parade. The camaraderie first comes to mind, wonderful horse people of like minds. The next reason for me would be the historical significance of horse-drawn vehicles. Most of the vehicles are antiques. The idea of having horse-drawn vehicles in a town as beautiful as Lebanon is really meaningful. When you consider that our country was built on horse power, it is nice to remind ourselves about it once in awhile. It’s also fun to play dress up!”

Another long-time parade participant and resident of Lebanon, Linda Freeman, proudly conveyed Santa and Mrs. Claus into town this year driving her two Hackney Horses to an antique sleigh (put on runners for the parade). “This is the twenty-third time I have been in the parade. It’s changed a lot; I’ve used different horses and carriages over the years. It’s always fun dressing up in Victorian costumes and ‘pretending’ for the parade. I like to participate in the parade because I am an enthusiastic, recreational driver and I like to use my horses in as many different situations as I can. It is fun. It takes hours and hours and hours of work to get ready for a parade like this, but it is a neat opportunity to give something back to the community by volunteering to be in the parade,” said Freeman.

Lebanon, which was founded in 1802, is situated about half way between Dayton and Cincinnati just east of Interstate 75 and to the north of Interstate 71. Famous former Lebanon residents include astronaut Neil Armstrong who lived with his family on a farm outside of the city after his lunar landing mission, actor Woody Harrelson of Cheers fame, and Thomas Corwin, governor of Ohio from 1840 – 1842 and U.S. Senator from 1844 – 1850. Two motion pictures were filmed in Lebanon, Harper Valley PTA starring Barbara Eden in 1979 and Milk Money featuring Ed Harris and Melanie Griffith in 1994.

Beyond the arts and craft booths at the Christmas Festival, Lebanon has a plethora of shopping and dining opportunities including a large antique mall, many small specialty shops and the Golden Lamb Inn. The inn was built in 1803 and is on the National Historic Register. Twelve U.S. presidents from John Quincy Adams to George W. Bush and a large number of other famous people including Mark Twain, Charles Dickens and Harriet Beecher Stowe have stayed in the inn. Festival attendees can dine in the inn or take a peek at the rooms where these famous people have stayed.

We wish we could show you every entry in the 2014 parade, but space does not allow. They were all awesome! See below a sampling of the entries. We encourage you to experience the parade for yourself in 2015!

Next year’s Lebanon Christmas Festival is Saturday, December 5, 2015, with parades at 1 and 7 p.m. Eastern Time. Other festival activities run from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information about attending or participating in the Lebanon Christmas Carriage Parade and Festival contact the Lebanon Chamber of Commerce, 513-932-1100 or sara@lebanonchamber.org or go to http://www.lebanonchamber.org/.

1-Opening the parade and carrying the American flag was the Patriot Farms Hitch of Haflingers Casey and Patty driven by Garth Louth. The Louth family, Rockford, Ohio, paid tribute to U.S. troops serving around the world and asked the crowd to remember veterans and their families during the holidays and throughout the year.

1-Opening the parade and carrying the American flag was the Patriot Farms Hitch of Haflingers Casey and Patty driven by Garth Louth. The Louth family, Rockford, Ohio, paid tribute to U.S. troops serving around the world and asked the crowd to remember veterans and their families during the holidays and throughout the year.

2-Driver Linda Freeman (dressed as the toy soldier) of Lebanon, Ohio, had the honor of delivering Santa and Mrs. Claus to town. She drove her two Argentinean-born Hackney Horse geldings Brownie (age 17 on the driver’s left) and Bill (age 15 on the right) to a circa 1880’s antique Hudson Valley six-passenger sleigh which was mounted on wheels for the parade. The sleigh is owned by Michael and Carol Burke, Loveland, Ohio, (who are riding in the sleigh as Santa and Mrs. Claus respectively). The sleigh cost $20,000 to restore and the 2014 parade was the first time it had been put to horses. The sleigh was accompanied by out walkers dressed in period costumes, both from Lebanon:  Tracy Raikes, who is walking Linda’s rescued “pound puppy” Darwin, and Tracy’s son Christopher (not shown in the photo).

2-Driver Linda Freeman (dressed as the toy soldier) of Lebanon, Ohio, had the honor of delivering Santa and Mrs. Claus to town. She drove her two Argentinean-born Hackney Horse geldings Brownie (age 17 on the driver’s left) and Bill (age 15 on the right) to a circa 1880’s antique Hudson Valley six-passenger sleigh which was mounted on wheels for the parade. The sleigh is owned by Michael and Carol Burke, Loveland, Ohio, (who are riding in the sleigh as Santa and Mrs. Claus respectively). The sleigh cost $20,000 to restore and the 2014 parade was the first time it had been put to horses. The sleigh was accompanied by out walkers dressed in period costumes, both from Lebanon: Tracy Raikes, who is walking Linda’s rescued “pound puppy” Darwin, and Tracy’s son Christopher (not shown in the photo).

3-A peek down Broadway Street, the main drag of Lebanon, shows in the foreground parade entry number 41, an six-horse Mini hitch owned and driven by Judd Porter, of St. Louisville, Ohio, with Lebanon Mayor Amy Brewer riding shotgun with subsequent entries trailing behind them.  Around 185,000 people lined the streets of Lebanon to view the 2014 afternoon and evening parades. The parade was well organized with a large number of volunteers from the area and from the Ohio Horseman’s Council (dressed in either yellow or green vests) who helped with crowd control, answered questions and passed out complimentary festival programs. At the end of the parade the city street cleaner made the rounds to tidy up the “horse exhaust”.

3-A peek down Broadway Street, the main drag of Lebanon, shows in the foreground parade entry number 41, an six-horse Mini hitch owned and driven by Judd Porter, of St. Louisville, Ohio, with Lebanon Mayor Amy Brewer riding shotgun with subsequent entries trailing behind them. Around 185,000 people lined the streets of Lebanon to view the 2014 afternoon and evening parades. The parade was well organized with a large number of volunteers from the area and from the Ohio Horseman’s Council (dressed in either yellow or green vests) who helped with crowd control, answered questions and passed out complimentary festival programs. At the end of the parade the city street cleaner made the rounds to tidy up the “horse exhaust”.

4-Charlie Poppe, Meadowbrook Farm, Cincinnati, Ohio, has participated in every Lebanon Christmas Carriage Parade since its inception in 1989. In 2014 he drove his Hackney Pony geldings Oh Canada (age 11 on driver’s left) and Facebook (age 9 on right) to an antique Victoria carriage built by the Mulbacher Company in Paris, France. The carriage was made for the first 1876 Centennial, the world’s first exhibition to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the U.S.A.  (held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), where it earned a gold certificate for the best vehicle in the formal vehicles class. After the exhibition, Sarah Roosevelt, FDR’s mother, purchased the carriage for their Hyde Park Estate on the Hudson River. FDR used it for one of his inaugurations.  The carriage is a ¾-size vehicle which was popular from the Civil War through around 1900 following the Spanish American War. The reason for making this size of carriage was to avoid their horses being requisitioned by the U.S. War Department for use by the Army; the Army was only interested in horses over 15 hands so the ¾-size vehicles were made to be pulled by smaller horses and ponies. Out walkers for Poppe’s carriage were Wade and Luke and their girlfriends rode in the carriage for the afternoon parade. Poppe’s extensive collection of about 40 historic carriages can be viewed on his Facebook page.  Poppe talked about his experience of participating in all of the parades thus far, “The very first year of the parade, it was by invitation only. It has mushroomed into a fabulous event. The nice thing is that the parade has stayed all horse-drawn. At night it becomes a magical wonderland with the lights. It is really beautiful.”

4-Charlie Poppe, Meadowbrook Farm, Cincinnati, Ohio, has participated in every Lebanon Christmas Carriage Parade since its inception in 1989. In 2014 he drove his Hackney Pony geldings Oh Canada (age 11 on driver’s left) and Facebook (age 9 on right) to an antique Victoria carriage built by the Mulbacher Company in Paris, France. The carriage was made for the first 1876 Centennial, the world’s first exhibition to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the U.S.A. (held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), where it earned a gold certificate for the best vehicle in the formal vehicles class. After the exhibition, Sarah Roosevelt, FDR’s mother, purchased the carriage for their Hyde Park Estate on the Hudson River. FDR used it for one of his inaugurations.
The carriage is a ¾-size vehicle which was popular from the Civil War through around 1900 following the Spanish American War. The reason for making this size of carriage was to avoid their horses being requisitioned by the U.S. War Department for use by the Army; the Army was only interested in horses over 15 hands so the ¾-size vehicles were made to be pulled by smaller horses and ponies. Out walkers for Poppe’s carriage were Wade and Luke and their girlfriends rode in the carriage for the afternoon parade. Poppe’s extensive collection of about 40 historic carriages can be viewed on his Facebook page.
Poppe talked about his experience of participating in all of the parades thus far, “The very first year of the parade, it was by invitation only. It has mushroomed into a fabulous event. The nice thing is that the parade has stayed all horse-drawn. At night it becomes a magical wonderland with the lights. It is really beautiful.”

5-The Kroger grocery store chain owns an original Barney delivery wagon which was driven in the parade by Stan Voorhees. The wagon was used by the original Kroger family store based in Cincinnati, Ohio, in the late 1880’s. The wagon was pulled by two Percherons.

5-The Kroger grocery store chain owns an original Barney delivery wagon which was driven in the parade by Stan Voorhees. The wagon was used by the original Kroger family store based in Cincinnati, Ohio, in the late 1880’s. The wagon was pulled by two Percherons.

6-Bob and Angel Kilburn, Kilburn Farm, Morrow, Ohio, drove their two Percherons hitched to a festive red wagon.

6-Bob and Angel Kilburn, Kilburn Farm, Morrow, Ohio, drove their two Percherons hitched to a festive red wagon.

7-This cute 17-year-old Welsh-cross pony mare named Buckeye, is owned and driven Cindy Glaser, Mariah Pines Farm, Tipp City, Ohio. Buckeye is hitched to a circa 1900s wicker governess cart that was formerly owned by Sally Coop of Vandalia and was restored by the Glasners. This was Buckeye’s tenth time to participate in the Lebanon parade.

7-This cute 17-year-old Welsh-cross pony mare named Buckeye, is owned and driven Cindy Glaser, Mariah Pines Farm, Tipp City, Ohio. Buckeye is hitched to a circa 1900s wicker governess cart that was formerly owned by Sally Coop of Vandalia and was restored by the Glasners. This was Buckeye’s tenth time to participate in the Lebanon parade.

8-Steve Muterspaw of Lebanon drove his Mini mare Jenny to a sulky in this year’s parade. Steve’s passengers were his wife Susan and granddaughter Leanne Nicole Hawkins. Take note of Jenny’s Christmas socks!

8-Steve Muterspaw of Lebanon drove his Mini mare Jenny to a sulky in this year’s parade. Steve’s passengers were his wife Susan and granddaughter Leanne Nicole Hawkins. Take note of Jenny’s Christmas socks!

9-This adorable Mini mare Savannah, who wore a festive garland around her neck, pulled a cart driven by her owner Karen Dalton, Franklin, Ohio, who was accompanied by her grandchildren.

9-This adorable Mini mare Savannah, who wore a festive garland around her neck, pulled a cart driven by her owner Karen Dalton, Franklin, Ohio, who was accompanied by her grandchildren.

10-Art Brown, Rocky Creek Farms, Middle Point Ohio, proudly drove his blue and white clad Appaloosa Mini Gingersnap down Broadway during the parade.

10-Art Brown, Rocky Creek Farms, Middle Point Ohio, proudly drove his blue and white clad Appaloosa Mini Gingersnap down Broadway during the parade.

11-The elves, a.k.a. the Leveck family from Jamestown, Ohio, were appropriately clad in red and green. Jane Leveck drove this Amish-made wagon pulled by mini donkeys Lilly and Bailey who were led by Kandy and Renee Leveck.

11-The elves, a.k.a. the Leveck family from Jamestown, Ohio, were appropriately clad in red and green. Jane Leveck drove this Amish-made wagon pulled by mini donkeys Lilly and Bailey who were led by Kandy and Renee Leveck.

12-Junior driver Gretchen Green from Circle G Ranch, Burbank, Ohio, drove this flashy Mini to a doctor’s buggy.

12-Junior driver Gretchen Green from Circle G Ranch, Burbank, Ohio, drove this flashy Mini to a doctor’s buggy.

13-Resembling the previous Mini in color and markings, only in extra large size, this Clydesdale named Guiness pulled an Amish cart driven by his owner Karen Greene of Hillcroft Crescent Farm, South Charleston, Ohio. Karen and Guiness are accompanied by Don Marion walking alongside the cart. This was their first appearance in the Lebanon Christmas Parade.

13-Resembling the previous Mini in color and markings, only in extra large size, this Clydesdale named Guiness pulled an Amish cart driven by his owner Karen Greene of Hillcroft Crescent Farm, South Charleston, Ohio. Karen and Guiness are accompanied by Don Marion walking alongside the cart. This was their first appearance in the Lebanon Christmas Parade.

14-Another first time entry in the parade was this petite buckboard wagon pulled by a pinto Mini from Riverside Topsoil and Stock Farm, Morrow, Ohio. Jessica Whitt was driving accompanied in the wagon by her family.

14-Another first time entry in the parade was this petite buckboard wagon pulled by a pinto Mini from Riverside Topsoil and Stock Farm, Morrow, Ohio. Jessica Whitt was driving accompanied in the wagon by her family.

15-Jocelyn, a.k.a. Josey, a 12-year-old Friesian-Percheron cross mare driven by Nancy Juergens, CN Ranch, Hartford, Ohio. Josey pulled a 1947 two-seat surrey owned by Don and Karen Heaberlin of Lebanon. This carriage was sponsored by the Humane Association of Warren County and riding in the carriage are two of the founders of the association, Karen Heaberlin (front seat next to Nancy) and Mari Lee Schwarzwalder in the back seat holding Nancy’s rescued Beagle Daisy Darlin’. Nancy’s husband Carl also drove in the parade with Josey’s dam, a 20-year-old Percheron mare named Sally, and Josey’s full sister Jillian, 10, pulling a beautiful white vis-à-vis carriage (French for face to face, in this case meaning the seats in the carriage face one another). “Our horses not only drive, but we also trail ride them. Josey has ridden down Bryce Canyon in Utah and also in Wyoming and Montana. Our horses love to do things. We’ve been in more states than most people get to riding our horses. The first year that Josey was in the Lebanon parade was in 2008. Her dam Sally was in the parade for the first time in 2004. We love coming down here; Lebanon is a beautiful backdrop and a lovely historic, quiet country town.”

15-Jocelyn, a.k.a. Josey, a 12-year-old Friesian-Percheron cross mare driven by Nancy Juergens, CN Ranch, Hartford, Ohio. Josey pulled a 1947 two-seat surrey owned by Don and Karen Heaberlin of Lebanon. This carriage was sponsored by the Humane Association of Warren County and riding in the carriage are two of the founders of the association, Karen Heaberlin (front seat next to Nancy) and Mari Lee Schwarzwalder in the back seat holding Nancy’s rescued Beagle Daisy Darlin’. Nancy’s husband Carl also drove in the parade with Josey’s dam, a 20-year-old Percheron mare named Sally, and Josey’s full sister Jillian, 10, pulling a beautiful white vis-à-vis carriage (French for face to face, in this case meaning the seats in the carriage face one another). “Our horses not only drive, but we also trail ride them. Josey has ridden down Bryce Canyon in Utah and also in Wyoming and Montana. Our horses love to do things. We’ve been in more states than most people get to riding our horses. The first year that Josey was in the Lebanon parade was in 2008. Her dam Sally was in the parade for the first time in 2004. We love coming down here; Lebanon is a beautiful backdrop and a lovely historic, quiet country town.”

16-The Wells Fargo stagecoach driven by Ty Kukhan, Mason City, Iowa, and owned by Wells Fargo Bank. The coach is pulled by four matching chestnut Quarter Horses. Riding in the stagecoach are Brandi Aliaga with her daughters Maddie and Sophia and Robert and Robyn Buskirk and their children Elle and Ryan.

16-The Wells Fargo stagecoach driven by Ty Kukhan, Mason City, Iowa, and owned by Wells Fargo Bank. The coach is pulled by four matching chestnut Quarter Horses. Riding in the stagecoach are Brandi Aliaga with her daughters Maddie and Sophia and Robert and Robyn Buskirk and their children Elle and Ryan.

17-Making their seventeenth appearance in the Lebanon Christmas Carriage Parade was the six-horse Clydesdale team from Old Tyme Travel driven by Debbie Bechstein. The hitch was sponsored by Trihealth.

17-Making their seventeenth appearance in the Lebanon Christmas Carriage Parade was the six-horse Clydesdale team from Old Tyme Travel driven by Debbie Bechstein. The hitch was sponsored by Trihealth.

18-The six-Mini Horse hitch was a parade favorite. The adorable team is owned and driven by Judd Porter, St. Louisville, Ohio, with Lebanon Mayor Amy Brewer on the seat next to him and other Lebanon residents riding along in the back of the wagon.

18-The six-Mini Horse hitch was a parade favorite. The adorable team is owned and driven by Judd Porter, St. Louisville, Ohio, with Lebanon Mayor Amy Brewer on the seat next to him and other Lebanon residents riding along in the back of the wagon.

19-Nancy Jackson, Maineville, Ohio, the President of the Ohio Valley Carriage Club (OVCC), and her Percheron gelding Buck (then 24 years old) pulling her crane necked brett carriage built around 1840 by a company in Newark, New Jersey, in the 2012 Lebanon Christmas Carriage Parade. They participated in 15 previous Lebanon parades, but Buck is now in semi-retirement at age 26, so Jackson did not drive in the 2014 parade. However, Jackson was an out walker for another carriage driver this year. The Jacksons purchased the brett on e-Bay and it was restored by her husband over a six-year period.  Photo by Nancy’s father-in-law Don Cox

19-Nancy Jackson, Maineville, Ohio, the President of the Ohio Valley Carriage Club (OVCC), and her Percheron gelding Buck (then 24 years old) pulling her crane necked brett carriage built around 1840 by a company in Newark, New Jersey, in the 2012 Lebanon Christmas Carriage Parade. They participated in 15 previous Lebanon parades, but Buck is now in semi-retirement at age 26, so Jackson did not drive in the 2014 parade. However, Jackson was an out walker for another carriage driver this year. The Jacksons purchased the brett on e-Bay and it was restored by her husband over a six-year period. Photo by Nancy’s father-in-law Don Cox

20-The finale to the Christmas Carriage Parade is traditionally the 1892 Airens fire pumper owned by Jack Selvey and pulled by a four-abreast team consisting of Percherons and pinto drafts. This year four generations of one family were represented on the pumper, driver Gary Hopkins from Lynchburg, Ohio, with his daughter Greta Branham, grandson Josh Branham and great granddaughter Emma Branham.

20-The finale to the Christmas Carriage Parade is traditionally the 1892 Airens fire pumper owned by Jack Selvey and pulled by a four-abreast team consisting of Percherons and pinto drafts. This year four generations of one family were represented on the pumper, driver Gary Hopkins from Lynchburg, Ohio, with his daughter Greta Branham, grandson Josh Branham and great granddaughter Emma Branham.

21-A wide variety of tempting treats and beautiful arts and crafts were available for purchase in the Christmas Festival Foods and Crafts Alley. In addition, downtown Lebanon has a large number of shops and restaurants open for business on parade day. The Tack Trunk tack shop in Lebanon also has a holiday open house during the festival.

21-A wide variety of tempting treats and beautiful arts and crafts were available for purchase in the Christmas Festival Foods and Crafts Alley. In addition, downtown Lebanon has a large number of shops and restaurants open for business on parade day. The Tack Trunk tack shop in Lebanon also has a holiday open house during the festival.

22-The historic Golden Lamb Inn is the oldest continuously operating inn in Ohio. The inn was built in 1803 and is on the National Historic Register. Twelve U.S. presidents from John Quincy Adams to George W. Bush and a large number of other famous people including Mark Twain, Charles Dickens and Harriet Beecher Stowe have stayed in the inn. Festival attendees can dine in the inn or take a peek at the rooms where these famous people have stayed.

22-The historic Golden Lamb Inn is the oldest continuously operating inn in Ohio. The inn was built in 1803 and is on the National Historic Register. Twelve U.S. presidents from John Quincy Adams to George W. Bush and a large number of other famous people including Mark Twain, Charles Dickens and Harriet Beecher Stowe have stayed in the inn. Festival attendees can dine in the inn or take a peek at the rooms where these famous people have stayed.

23-The sign hanging on the historic Golden Lamb Inn on Broadway Street in Lebanon. The inn has a tavern, a gift shop, four public and four private dining rooms offering a gourmet menu and four flours with forty total guest rooms.

23-The sign hanging on the historic Golden Lamb Inn on Broadway Street in Lebanon. The inn has a tavern, a gift shop, four public and four private dining rooms offering a gourmet menu and four floors with forty total guest rooms.

24-In keeping with the holiday season the Lebanon Presbyterian Church youth group presented a living nativity on the corner of Warren and East streets.

24-In keeping with the holiday season the Lebanon Presbyterian Church youth group presented a living nativity on the corner of Warren and East streets.

Fabulous opportunity for horseman wanted to know what good footing means to the FEI

December 03, 2014 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

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Come to the FEI footing seminar that is happening December 8th!
Are you going to be in the Northeast the beginning of December? Join Nick Attwood and a panel of FEI experts for the Equine Feet & Footing – FREE PRESENTATION by the country’s best experts.

A reception for sport horse enthusiasts to meet FEI sponsored scientists, followed by a discussion of equine injury prevention through the design of equine arena surfaces.

Monday, December 8, 2014, 6:00pm–8:00pm

Presentation followed by questions and open discussion with Equine Surfaces White Paper scientists led by Michael “Mick” Peterson, Ph.D., University of Maine

To Register at no charge, email Elizabeth Erickson at elizabeth.erickson@umit.maine.edu and Elizabeth Creamer at equestrian@pinelandfarms.org

For more information, contact Dr. Robert Causey at robert.causey@umit.maine.edu or 207-922-7475

This event has been organized and sponsored by the University of Maine, Pineland Farms, Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory and the Laboratory for Expansion of Animal Disease Surveillance.The FEI has since 2009 supported research into the effect of arena surfaces on the orthopaedic health of sport horses. The white paper focuses on arena surfaces within the broad context of providing training and competition arenas for sport horses that facilitate maximal performance while minimizing the risk of injury. It includes a description of the physical properties of the surface that determine how the horse perceives the footing and the effects of the footing on the horse’s physiological and biomechanical responses. It also covers aspects of composition, construction, and maintenance that are necessary to build and maintain arenas with the desired physical properties. Current methods of measuring the physical properties of the surface are described using terms that are easily understood by riders, trainers, course designers and arena builders. It is hoped that this information will provide a basis to guide future progress in this area.

This white paper has been drafted as a collection of published scientific papers and data. It is considered a work in progress and will be updated as new scientific studies and surface data become available. Authored by Sarah Jane Hobbs, Ph.D., University of Central Lancashire, UK, Alison J. Northrop, M.Sc., Anglia Ruskin University, UK, Christie Mahaffey, Ph.D., Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory, USA, Jaime H. Martin, Ph.D., Myerscough College, UK, Hilary M. Clayton, BVMS, Ph.D., MRCVS, Michigan State University, USA, Rachel Murray, MA VetMB MS Ph.D., MRCVS, Animal Health Trust, UK, Lars Roepstorff, DVM, Ph.D., Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden, and Michael “Mick” Peterson, Ph.D., University of Maine, USA.