What's Happenin'

A Sidelines blog

Fabulous opportunity for horseman wanted to know what good footing means to the FEI

December 03, 2014 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

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Come to the FEI footing seminar that is happening December 8th!
Are you going to be in the Northeast the beginning of December? Join Nick Attwood and a panel of FEI experts for the Equine Feet & Footing – FREE PRESENTATION by the country’s best experts.

A reception for sport horse enthusiasts to meet FEI sponsored scientists, followed by a discussion of equine injury prevention through the design of equine arena surfaces.

Monday, December 8, 2014, 6:00pm–8:00pm

Presentation followed by questions and open discussion with Equine Surfaces White Paper scientists led by Michael “Mick” Peterson, Ph.D., University of Maine

To Register at no charge, email Elizabeth Erickson at elizabeth.erickson@umit.maine.edu and Elizabeth Creamer at equestrian@pinelandfarms.org

For more information, contact Dr. Robert Causey at robert.causey@umit.maine.edu or 207-922-7475

This event has been organized and sponsored by the University of Maine, Pineland Farms, Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory and the Laboratory for Expansion of Animal Disease Surveillance.The FEI has since 2009 supported research into the effect of arena surfaces on the orthopaedic health of sport horses. The white paper focuses on arena surfaces within the broad context of providing training and competition arenas for sport horses that facilitate maximal performance while minimizing the risk of injury. It includes a description of the physical properties of the surface that determine how the horse perceives the footing and the effects of the footing on the horse’s physiological and biomechanical responses. It also covers aspects of composition, construction, and maintenance that are necessary to build and maintain arenas with the desired physical properties. Current methods of measuring the physical properties of the surface are described using terms that are easily understood by riders, trainers, course designers and arena builders. It is hoped that this information will provide a basis to guide future progress in this area.

This white paper has been drafted as a collection of published scientific papers and data. It is considered a work in progress and will be updated as new scientific studies and surface data become available. Authored by Sarah Jane Hobbs, Ph.D., University of Central Lancashire, UK, Alison J. Northrop, M.Sc., Anglia Ruskin University, UK, Christie Mahaffey, Ph.D., Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory, USA, Jaime H. Martin, Ph.D., Myerscough College, UK, Hilary M. Clayton, BVMS, Ph.D., MRCVS, Michigan State University, USA, Rachel Murray, MA VetMB MS Ph.D., MRCVS, Animal Health Trust, UK, Lars Roepstorff, DVM, Ph.D., Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden, and Michael “Mick” Peterson, Ph.D., University of Maine, USA.

2014 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Horse Show Underway in Toronto

November 13, 2014 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

2014 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Horse Show Underway in Toronto

 

By Kim & Allen MacMillan/MacMillan Photography – All Photos by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

 

The 2014 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair kicked off on Friday, November 7 with a flurry of activity that makes the Royal one of the iconic indoor horse shows of the year. This final stop of the year on the North American Nations Cup show jumping indoor tour, the 2014 Royal Winter Fair Horse Show CSI4*-W features top-tier international jumper riders hailing from Canada, the U.S.A., Colombia, Ireland and Belgium.

 

These riders are all vying for over $800,000 in total prize money and the top ribbon in the $100,000 Hickstead FEI World CupTM Grand Prix presented by Hudson’s Bay (Wednesday, November 12th), the $50,000 Weston Canadian Open (Friday, November 14th) and Saturday evening’s sold-out $75,000 GroupBy Big Ben Challenge.

 

The Royal, which received the “Royal” designation by King George V of England, began as a Canadian agriculture showcase in 1922 and has been operating continuously since then except for during World War II. The Royal takes place at the Canadian National Exhibition Place in downtown Toronto. Today the Royal attracts over 300,000 visitors annually. This year’s fair runs November 7 – 16.

 

Over 800 horses will compete at the Royal Winter Fair including show jumpers, hunters, dressage horses, draft horse hitches, antique carriage teams, indoor eventing competitors, Shetland Pony Grand National steeplechasers, and sport horse breeding class participants. In addition there are many other horses in the Royal Rodeo and in other entertainment programs and demonstrations throughout the 10-day run of the show.

 

Beyond the horse show, there are cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, rabbits and poultry, as well as crops and garden produce, butter sculptures and 4-H rabbit jumping contestants entered in the Royal Fair. And the “Super Dogs” are back competing in agility. Add to that an amazing array of food choices and shopping booths (offering a wide variety of equestrian, agricultural and mainstream products). There is never a dull moment at the Royal! For more information about Royal Agricultural Winter Fair go to www.royalfair.org .

 

All photos courtesy of MacMillan Photography. Photos are copyrighted. For information or to purchase photos contact us at photo@LoonCreekEnterprises.com

New to the Royal this year was the Grand National Shetland Pony racing. We submitted this picture to Wikipedia to help them illustrate their definition of “CUTE!”Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

New to the Royal this year was the Grand National Shetland Pony racing. We submitted this picture to Wikipedia to help them illustrate their definition of “CUTE!” Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

The Grand National Shetland Pony racing jockeys practicing their “cool” Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

The Grand National Shetland Pony racing jockeys practicing their “cool” Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Winning the opening round of the Greenhawk Canadian Show Jumping Championships on the first night of the Royal Horse Show was the 13-year- old Dutch Warmblood gelding Star Power, owned by Team Works and ridden by Ian Millar of Perth, Ontario. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Winning the opening round of the Greenhawk Canadian Show Jumping Championships on the first night of the Royal Horse Show was the 13-year- old Dutch Warmblood gelding Star Power, owned by Team Works and ridden by Ian Millar of Perth, Ontario. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Flying over the Maple Leaf jump is the nine-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding Appy Cara, owned by Angelstone Partners and ridden by Erynn Ballard of Tottenham, Ontario. Just a year and a half after a horrible fall left Ballard with many broken bones, potential nerve damage and a doctor warning her to give up riding, Ballard amazed even herself at her return to riding and her success in returning to the jumper ring. They took second in the opening round of the Greenhawk Canadian Show Jumping Championships on the first night of the Royal Horse Show.Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Flying over the Maple Leaf jump is the nine-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding Appy Cara, owned by Angelstone Partners and ridden by Erynn Ballard of Tottenham, Ontario. Just a year and a half after a horrible fall left Ballard with many broken bones, potential nerve damage and a doctor warning her to give up riding, Ballard amazed even herself at her return to riding and her success in returning to the jumper ring. They took second in the opening round of the Greenhawk Canadian Show Jumping Championships on the first night of the Royal Horse Show. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Winning the opening round of the $8,000 Canadian National Talent Squad presented by the Uplands Charitable Foundation on November 7, was the 7-year old gelding  Corrido, owned by Jessie Bonisteel with rider Neil Badcock of Schomberg , Ontario, in the irons. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Winning the opening round of the $8,000 Canadian National Talent Squad presented by the Uplands Charitable Foundation on November 7, was the 7-year old gelding Corrido, owned by Jessie Bonisteel with rider Neil Badcock of Schomberg , Ontario, in the irons. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Cheptel Gaston and his owner/rider by Vanessa Fenwick, Pefferlaw, Ontario, were competitors in the opening round of the $8,000 Canadian National Talent Squad. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Cheptel Gaston and his owner/rider by Vanessa Fenwick, Pefferlaw, Ontario, were competitors in the opening round of the $8,000 Canadian National Talent Squad. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Taking fourth in round one of the Canadian National Talent Squad jumping competition was (and it looks like practicing for the Puissance) the mare Just Stella L owned by Gabrielle Pelchat and ridden by Melissandre Lincourt of Montreal, Quebec. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Taking fourth in round one of the Canadian National Talent Squad jumping competition was (and it looks like practicing for the Puissance) the mare Just Stella L owned by Gabrielle Pelchat and ridden by Melissandre Lincourt of Montreal, Quebec. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Pinning the Large Pony  Hunter Under Saddle Class during the 2014 Royal Horse Show on the first Friday Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Pinning the Large Pony Hunter Under Saddle Class during the 2014 Royal Horse Show on the first Friday Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

An eventing clinic was held on the first weekend of the Royal Winter Fair in the President’s Choice Animal Theatre arena. The Animal Theatre is also the location of Super Dogs, 4-H bunny jumping, “Goats Galore” and many other entertaining events. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

An eventing clinic was held on the first weekend of the Royal Winter Fair in the President’s Choice Animal Theatre arena. The Animal Theatre is also the location of Super Dogs, 4-H bunny jumping, “Goats Galore” and many other entertaining events. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

A ring jammed full of massive draft horses and amazing wagons in the All-Breeds Four- Horse Registered Mares draft horse hitch class.  The class started with two groups being judged separately; then the ringmaster brought in all 11 teams back in at one time to line up.  The awesome sight of 44 horses and 11 wagons in the ring was impressive. The winner was Blue Ribbon Days  Farm with driver Cody Woodbury, owned by the Albert Cleve and Jim Day Families. The team is from Winchester, Indiana, U.S.A.Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

A ring jammed full of massive draft horses and amazing wagons in the All-Breeds Four- Horse Registered Mares draft horse hitch class. The class started with two groups being judged separately; then the ringmaster brought in all 11 teams back in at one time to line up. The awesome sight of 44 horses and 11 wagons in the ring was impressive. The winner was Blue Ribbon Days Farm with driver Cody Woodbury, owned by the Albert Cleve and Jim Day Families. The team is from Winchester, Indiana, U.S.A. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Trick riding, a preview of some of the action for the upcoming Sunday rodeo at the RoyalPhoto by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Trick riding, a preview of some of the action for the upcoming Sunday rodeo at the Royal Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Dutch Times, owned by Christina Aharoni and ridden by Tik Maynard of Vancouver, British Columbia. They were winners of the always exciting first round of the Horseware Ireland Indoor Eventing Challenge. Photographer Shelley Higgins says that Tik was interesting in that “he just about never touched the horse’s mouth; there were loops in the reins most of the time!”Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Dutch Times, owned by Christina Aharoni and ridden by Tik Maynard of Vancouver, British Columbia. They were winners of the always exciting first round of the Horseware Ireland Indoor Eventing Challenge. Photographer Shelley Higgins says that Tik was interesting in that “he just about never touched the horse’s mouth; there were loops in the reins most of the time!” Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Second place in the round one of the Horseware Ireland Indoor Eventing was Free Spirit, owned by Peter Barry and ridden by Colleen Loach. The course was designed by the Canadian International Eventing Coach Clayton Fredericks from Australia. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Second place in the round one of the Horseware Ireland Indoor Eventing was Free Spirit, owned by Peter Barry and ridden by Colleen Loach. The course was designed by the Canadian International Eventing Coach Clayton Fredericks from Australia. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Photographer Shelley Higgins couldn’t resist including a photo of the diminutive Forrest Nymph, ridden by U.S. eventer Sinead Halpin, Oldwick, New Jersey, and owned by Beth Davidson, in the Horseware Ireland Indoor Eventing Challenge. “Forrest Nymph was only 14.3 hands, but what a trier,” says Shelley. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

Photographer Shelley Higgins couldn’t resist including a photo of the diminutive Forrest Nymph, ridden by U.S. eventer Sinead Halpin, Oldwick, New Jersey, and owned by Beth Davidson, in the Horseware Ireland Indoor Eventing Challenge. “Forrest Nymph was only 14.3 hands, but what a trier,” says Shelley. Photo by Shelley Higgins/MacMillan Photography

 

Horse Stars Hall of Fame Celebrates 2014 Inductees

April 04, 2014 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

WESTPORT, CT – March 21, 2014 – Six Equine Athletes and four Equine Humanitarians were inducted into the Horse Stars Hall of Fame for 2014 at the EQUUS Foundation’s Fete Cheval Etoile on Sunday, March 17, 2014 at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center in Wellington, Florida.

For the EQUUS Foundation, it’s all about how horses move people beyond their boundaries. The ten joined the inaugural 62 horses inducted in 2013.

The EQUUS Foundation partnered with the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) in 2013 to establish the Horse Stars Hall of Fame to celebrate the extraordinary talent of horses and the magical bond between horses and people.

The Hall of Fame honors the contributions of amazing horses, shares the stories of their athletic and humanitarian feats and helps build a more informed and compassionate America that values the impact of horses in our lives.

2014 Horse Stars Hall of Fame Inductees

 

The Six Equine Athletes, each representing different breeds and disciplines and all recognized by the USEF as Horses of Honor, included A Ruf Gal, Bizkit, Brunello, CH Callaway’s Annabel Allison, Sam and Simon. (Left Top to Bottom)

A Ruf Gal, the 2013 USA Reining Horse of the Year, owned by Pete & Tamra Kyle, has truly proven herself as a talented athlete, delivering consistent performances, achieving impressive results, and always willing to give her all throughout her competitive career.

Bizkit, a Baroque Pinto shown in Part-Bred Friesian competition, owned by Gwendolyn Schmidt, holds s a total of nine World Grand Championships and 27 Regional Grand Championships and has a legacy extending beyond the show ring as a successful sire with five foals on the ground and three already winning top honors in in-hand competition.

Janet Peterson and Liza Boyd’s Brunello has been turning heads in the hunter ring with his signature style and consistent top placings for years, but in 2013, his achievements placed him at the pinnacle of the sport. He ended the year earning the top USEF honor of National Horse of the Year.

CH Callaway’s Annabel Allison entered the record books in 2013 as the first mare to win the Five-Gaited World’s Grand Championship title at the Kentucky State Fair since 1999, and Debbie Foley became the first professional woman to be trainer, rider, and sole owner of the winning horse.

Prior to the 2013 season, Sam had always been a stalwart for owner and driver Misdee Wrigley, but in 2013 he stepped up his game when he was needed most. Against all odds, Sam delivered the performance of a lifetime at the FEI World Driving Championships.

In 2013, Abigail Wexner’s Simon and his rider, Beezie Madden secured their place in the history books with an epic win on the world’s largest stage, claiming Madden’s first Rolex/FEI World Cup Finals title. For his efforts, Simon earned the title of USEF International Horse of the Year and Madden claimed USEF Equestrian of the Year.

* * * * *

The four Equine Humanitarians included the ever so brave public servants Skipper and Staff Sergeant Reckless and gentle giants Lucky To Be A Larkin and Mr Wise Guy +//.(Below Clockwise)

On September 22, 1987, police horse Skipper and the energetic 31-year-old officer, husband and father of four very young children, William D. McCarthy, were tragically killed while on patrol serving the Philadelphia community as a member of its Mounted Police Unit. The William D. McCarthy Memorial Trophy and now the induction of Skipper into the Horse Stars Hall of Fame will forever remind us of the service of the mounted police and the inherent danger present in police work.

Small in size, but huge in heart and spirit, Staff Sergeant Reckless was a “Jeju” was pony who became the real-lief warhorse of the U.S. Marine Fifth Regiment during the Korean War. Simply put, she was one of them. They were bound together, an amazing unit that accomplished more than either she or her fellow Marines could have done alone.

Mr Wise Guy +//, owned by Kristen Cuneo, had a stellar 15-year show career in the Arabian Horse World despite a severe injury as a young horse that resulted in a broken jaw and paralysis in the lower quadrant of his face. His injury caused his tongue to frequently hang out of his mouth – but at the end of his world class show career, at the age of 20, he transitioned into the life of a therapy horse.

Lucky to Be a Larkin was born the son of 1999 AQHA Super Horse Look Who’s Larkin and Grandson of AQHA Super Horse Rugged Lark – with all the potential for an outstanding sport career. His story is the story of a different destiny – a sensitive and kind horse and the bond he formed with Sherri Barnes and her daughter Kasey, born in 1993 with Downs Syndrome.

* * * * *

Since the beginning of civilization, horses have been vital to human survival. Although their role has changed, they continue to win our hearts and imagination. Thanks to the generosity of individual and corporate donors, the EQUUS Foundation is able to save some of these beautiful creatures that have been abused and abandoned.

The Foundation also helps retrain horses for multiple careers – as therapy animals, forever changing the lives of children and adults in need. The impact of horses can be as simple as building confidence to as astounding as first words – and first steps. The EQUUS Foundation will top $2.5 million in grant awards this year and now provides support to over 800 equine organizations across the United States.

 

Visit the Horse Stars Hall of Fame HERE to learn more about all the inductees.

Click here to learn more about the Fete Cheval Etoile.

 

 

About EQUUS Foundation

The EQUUS Foundation, a 501(c)(3) public charity established in 2002, also known as Horse Charities of America, is dedicated to improving the quality of life of horses, enabling the therapeutic use of horses for those in need, fostering the horse-human bond, and educating the public about the horse’s unique ability to empower, teach and heal. Donations are tax-deductible to the full extent of the law. Contact the EQUUS Foundation, Inc., at 168 Long Lots Road, Westport, CT 06880, Tele: (203) 259-1550, E-Mail:equus@equusfoundation.org, Website: www.equusfoundation.org.

 

About United States Equestrian Federation

Established in 1917, the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF), www.usef.org, is dedicated to uniting the equestrian community, honoring achievement, and serving as guardians of equestrian sport. The USEF promotes the safety and welfare of horses and riders while encouraging interest, participation and excellence at every competitive level and for all breed and discipline affiliates within the Federation family equally. The USEF is the only national organization dedicated to the promotion of the equestrian sport, fair competition and equine welfare regardless of breed or discipline.

Down Under! George Morris Travels to Australia and New Zealand for January Horsemastership Clinics

January 09, 2014 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

Wellington, FL – January 6, 2014 –  For legendary horseman and coach George Morris, sharing his secrets for success goes beyond U.S. borders. This month, Morris will be traveling to Australia and New Zealand, where riders and auditors will have the opportunity to learn from the best in the business. After retiring as Chef d’Equipe of the United States Show Jumping Team, Morris has set his sights on developing the future of the sport by conducting clinics around the world.

George H. Morris - Photo By: Kenneth Kraus/PhelpsSports.com

George H. Morris – Photo By: Kenneth Kraus/PhelpsSports.com

Vicki Roycroft, who will be hosting three of Morris’ clinics, commented, “I always look forward to George’s visits, as every time I learn something new. In this sport, one never stops learning, and after 40 odd years and three Olympics, I still find there is more to know. George has a hard core fan base out here led by me and other Olympic and World Games participants, Rod Brown and Chris Chugg and in New Zealand, John Cottle.”

 

“We are always excited to welcome master horseman, George Morris to New Zealand,” stated Cottle. “We know our riders will greatly benefit from his vast knowledge and his teaching of classical riding.”

 

Morris’ January schedule will include:

Jan 10-12: Roycroft Stables           

Vicki Roycroft

011-61-418-432-842

vickiroycroft@bigpond.com

Sydney, Australia

 

Jan 14-16: Ti Papa Farm           

John Cottle

011-64-212-200-275

john@johncottle.com

Brookby, New Zealand

 

Jan 18-19: Roycroft Stables- Rider Clinic

Vicki Roycroft

011-61-418-432-842

vickiroycroft@bigpond.com

Sydney, Australia

 

Jan 21-22: Roycroft Stables – Coaches Clinic

Vicki Roycroft

011-61-418-432-842

vickiroycroft@bigpond.com

Sydney, Australia

 

Jan 24-26: Autralian Sporting Equine Academy

Adam Wootten

011-61-439-994-669

ase.academy@bigpond.com

Victoria, Australia

 

Jan 28-30: Kolora Lodge

Michelle Lang-McMahon

011-61-404-824-738

admin@koloralodge.com.au

Queensland, Australia

 

Focusing on helping riders develop correct form and function, Morris has often been referred to as the founding father of hunt seat equitation. Second to none, his teachings, technique and style are revered around the world. Over the course of his career, Morris has been highly successful as a rider, coach, clinician, author and judge.

 

While the spots for the clinics filled up immediately, auditor positions are still available to gain knowledge from the esteemed Morris through observation, and a waiting list is available for riders should a spot become available.

 

For more information about the George Morris Clinics and his 2014 schedules please visit http://www.ghmclinics.com.

FEI Introduces New and Revised Dressage Tests Effective January 1, 2014

December 25, 2013 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

Lexington, Ky. – The Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) has announced revised and new dressage tests that will come into effect January 1, 2014. The FEI has revised its Intermediate II, Grand Prix, and Grand Prix Special, which will be applied at the start of the 2014 competition season.

usdf logo blue rgb large

Additionally, a Medium Tour has been announced to assist horse-and-rider combinations transition from the Small Tour to the Big Tour. The Medium Tour will utilize the newly introduced Intermediate A and B Tests and may be offered at either CDI Events and/or USEF/USDF Dressage Competitions.

These new and revised tests will impact USEF and USDF programs and championships as outlined below:

USEF Dressage Competitions may offer all FEI Tests effective January 1, 2014. CDI Organizers should refer to the updated FEI rules.

For the USEF Young Adult ‘Brentina Cup’ Dressage National Championships, when ridden in a CDI within the qualifying period, riders may choose to count either the FEI Intermediate II or the FEI Intermediate B towards the ranking list. There will be no changes to the tests ridden at the Championships.

For the Markel/USEF Developing Horse Grand Prix Dressage National Championships, there will be no changes to the tests that the horse/rider combinations ride in the qualifying competitions or at the Championships.

To qualify for the GAIG/USDF Regional Championships, horse/rider combinations will need to use either the Intermediate B or Intermediate II test to qualify for Intermediate B (formerly Intermediate II) Championship. At the Regional Championships and US Dressage Finals, horse/rider combinations will ride Intermediate B test.

All FEI Tests can be found here .

The vision of the United States Equestrian Federation® is to provide leadership

for equestrian sport in the United States of America by promoting the pursuit

of excellence from the grassroots to the Olympic Games, based on a

foundation of fair, safe competition and the welfare

of its human and equine athletes.

Important Changes to the both USEF and FEI Drugs & Medications Rules for Competition Horses Will Affect the 2014 Competition Year

November 26, 2013 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

 

From the USEF Communications Department

Prohibited Practices

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A new category of rules referred to as Prohibited Practices has been introduced to the USEF Rule Book which will take effect December 1, 2013. The first rule to be adopted in this category is commonly referred to as the “12 Hour Rule.” It was introduced in March of 2013 by the USEF Veterinary Committee and following extensive feedback from USEF Technical Committees, Working Groups, and from attendees at USEF Town Hall Meetings held in Florida in March, and via interactive webcast in June, the USEF Board of Directors at their mid-year meeting approved the proposal which is printed in its entirety here:

 

GR 414 Prohibited Practices

 

1. No injectable substances may be administered to any horse or pony within 12 hours prior to competing, with the following three exceptions subject to paragraph 2 below:

 

a. Therapeutic fluids, which amount must consist of a minimum of 10L of polyionic fluids; and which must be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations and guidelines. The fluids must not be supplemented with concentrated electrolytes, such as magnesium.

 

b. Antibiotics. Procaine penicillin G is prohibited under this exception.

 

c. Dexamethasone. This is permitted only for the treatment of acute urticaria(hives). The dose must not exceed 0.5 mg per 100lb (5.0 mg for 1000lb horse) if administered more than 6 hours and less than 12 hours prior to entering the competition ring, and must not exceed 1.0 mg per 100lb (10.0 mg for 1000lb horse) within any 24-hour period.

 

2. The above exceptions are permitted only when (i) the substance is administered by a licensed veterinarian and no less than six hours prior to competing; and (ii) the “Trainer” as defined under General Rule 404 properly files, or causes to be properly filed, an Equine Drugs and Medications Report Form with the Steward/Technical Delegate or competition office representative within one hour after the administration of the substance or one hour after the Steward/Technical Delegate or competition office representative returns to duty if the administration occurs at a time outside competition hours. The Steward/Technical Delegate or competition office representative shall sign and record the time of receipt on the Equine Drugs and Medications Report Form.

 

In summary, there are a few bullet points to remember about this rule change.

No horses or ponies maybe injected within twelve hours of competing.

There are only three exceptions to this rule: therapeutic fluids, antibiotics, and Dexamethasone (for the treatment of hives).

All excepted substances must be administered by a veterinarian and cannot be administered to a horse or pony within six hours of competing.

There are three restricted medications that are affected by this change:

Dexamethasone (Azium®) – maximum 24 hour dose has been decreased from 20mg/1000lb horse to 10mg/1000lb horse and must be administered in accordance with the new “12 Hour Rule” GR414.

Ketoprofen (Ketofen®) – maximum 24 hour dose 1.0 gram/1000lb horse remains the same, however it must be administered no later than 12 hours prior to competition.

Methocarbamol (Robaxin®) – maximum 24 hour dose 5.0grams/1000lb horse remains the same, however must be administered no later than 12 hours prior to competition.

 

CHANGES TO FEI EQUINE PROHIBITED SUBSTANCES LIST FOR 2014

 

The FEI Bureau has approved changes to the FEI Equine Prohibited Substances List proposed by the FEI List Group. The new List will become effective January 1, 2014.

 

The changes are summarized here and below:

 

Two new Controlled Medication substances have been added to the List for 2014:

Metformin – a potent but legitimate oral anti-diabetic drug with a potential welfare risk;

Levothyroxine – an exogenous thyroid hormone replacement that could enhance performance;

Adrenocortico-trophic hormone (ACTH)is currently classified as a Banned Substance and will be moved to the Controlled Medication section of the 2014 List due to its therapeutic value in equine medicine.

 

Three previously unlisted substanceswill be added to the Banned Substances section of the 2014 List, as they are considered to have a potential for abuse, or to improve athletic performance:

Ammonium Chloride injectable

Gamma-Butyrolactone (GBL)

Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB)

The changes to the FEI Equine Prohibited Substances List are also accessible on the FEI Clean Sport webpage. The FEI Equine Prohibited Substances Database will be amended and the complete 2014 Equine Prohibited Substances List will be made available on the Clean Sport website prior to January 1, 2014.

 

These changes have been noticed in accordance with FEI Rules requiring all changes to the List to be published 90 days in advance in order to allow National Federations, athletes and veterinarians sufficient time to familiarize themselves with the revised List prior to implementation.

 

The new competition year begins December 1, 2013. The USEF encourages every exhibitor, trainer, coach, and owner to take time, prior to competing, to carefully review the “Guidelines for How Long Drugs Remain Detectable” which is included in the 2014 USEF Drugs & Medications Guidelines and can be accessed by clicking here or by contacting the USEF Drugs & Medication Program at Medequestrian@aol.com. You may also call the USEF Drugs & Medications office at 800-633-2472 to request a copy.

The vision of the United States Equestrian Federation® is to provide leadership

for equestrian sport in the United States of America by promoting the pursuit

of excellence from the grassroots to the Olympic Games, based on a

foundation of fair, safe competition and the welfare

of its human and equine athletes.

Good Food Hunting: Foodie Interview with Kate Samuels

October 10, 2013 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

By Kat Wojtylak

Hearty beef stew with cornbread cooked up by Kate.

Hearty beef stew with cornbread cooked up by Kate.

Kate Samuels is a writer for Eventing Nation. She tackles the obstacles in her life as an event rider and does it all while she moonlights as a foodie. Kate ‘s story is like many others out there. She is trying to make it as a professional rider while she enjoys some of the finer pleasures in life. She likes to quip about the antics of her six year old gelding and throw dinner parties. She’s not your average equestrian, but then again, who is?

 

KW: Tell us about your background with horses and how you got started with it all.

KS: My mom has ridden her whole life and was responsible for getting me a pony when I was three. Before that, I was propped up on her horse in front of her. By the time I turned seven, I purchased a wild yearling from a herd of Spanish horses in North Carolina. I was feral as a child. I used to go out bareback with a halter and a leadshank and leave the farm for hours at a time, exploring on my own. Bless my parents, they let me do that. It certainly taught me a lot about stickability! My first job was riding at a race track when I was thirteen which was probably another questionable parenting choice, but I loved it. I’ve been eventing since I was twelve, with occasional forays back into the racehorse scene. However, nothing can top the thrill of cross country so I don’t think I’ll ever be able to do anything else.

Kate riding Nyls du Terroir bridle less over a 4'6" jump.

Kate riding Nyls du Terroir bridle less over a 4’6″ jump.

KW: What is your horse status now?
KS: I currently have three horses and a retired pony. Nyls du Terroir, “Nyls”, is my Advanced/3* horse, whom I’ve had since he was a wee monster in 2005. We’ve come up the levels together and he’s a complete athletic freak. Anybody who knows him can tell you that he’s a serious character, but then again, aren’t all geniuses? Then I have an eight year old Thoroughbred mare named La Vie En Rose, “Ella”. I pulled her out of a field as an unbroke six year old. She has since evented through training level and done some fox-hunting. She’s probably the sweetest horse I’ve ever owned, but I realize she just isn’t going to be an upper level mount. Even though she’s looking for a new home, she likes to hang out with my 30 year old pony, Hershey, who bosses all the horses around. Last but not least is my lovely six year old Hanoverian gelding, named Lucky Gold, or “Leo”, whom I was given. He’s a giant, clocking in at 17.1 hh. He’s really athletic and very sweet, but just hasn’t had very much education. Leo was handled by riders who were no match for him physically or mentally.  He’s also really talented at broncing- which is why I got him! I’ve had him for two months now and he’s slowly learning how to be a good boy. I’m not sure what his future holds, but he’s a great horse and I’m sure he’ll be cured of his bucking and find a job he likes, even if it isn’t eventing. You can follow his progress here on a weekly blog for him through Eventing Nation!
 
KW: What are some things you’re working on now relating to horses?
KS: I’m an avid eventer trying to make my way as a professional rider, but I also spend time as a co-editor and staff writer for Eventing Nation. EN is the most informative, witty, ridiculous, and popular source for everything eventing; it’s a great place to work. I like writing and I get to write about what I love which is a huge bonus. I’ve met some wonderful people through doing that, and I really enjoy it.
KW: What’s your favorite memory relating to horses? 
KS: There are too many to choose from! I remember hiding in an old abandoned barn once during a thunderstorm with my pony, I was probably nine or ten at the time. That was scary and fun! Then there was winning my first FEI competition at the 2007 Virginia CCI* with Nyls as a six year old. However, placing 2nd at our first CCI2* behind only my coach was great too, as was competing at NAJYRC and winning bronze individual and silver team medals. I think every time I come off a cross country course no matter what the level, I get a new favorite memory. Having that experience with my horse and feeling them come off the course confident and happy is just a wonderful thing.
Kate's pumpkin dream cake.

Kate’s pumpkin dream cake.

KW: What’s your connection to the food industry, or what was? 
KS: During the winter one year in college, I decided to teach myself to bake. Armed with my grandmother’s recipe book and several willing taste testers for roommates, I baked up a storm. Since I wasn’t riding much due to the crummy weather, I applied for a job as a sous chef at a newly opened restaurant. I showed up at the interview with a warm apple buttermilk custard pie in hand. I told the chef and owner three things: 1) I have no actual qualifications or a resume that applies to this job, 2) I work incredibly hard, and I learn really quickly, and 3) I promise that I won’t cry no matter how hard it gets, or how stressful the kitchen becomes. I was hired on the spot! I worked there for two years and learned a lot about cooking. I even got several of my desserts written up in the local food column! Now with my focus on eventing, I just cook for pleasure. I really enjoy throwing lavish dinner parties for my friends. I live in a really wonderful place that has a lot of emphasis on fresh locally grown food, so I take advantage of that all the time. The farmer’s market is great on Saturdays, and meat and veggies right from the farm are so much tastier! I love using any excuse I can get to grill, but also bake a lot too. I always give that away, I can’t eat a whole pie by myself!
KW: What’s your favorite horse show to attend or compete at? Tell us about the food!
KS: Most competitions that I like attending aren’t my favorites because of their food selection! Horse show food is notoriously bad, but it’s also sooooo devilishly good! The local church groups that come out and cook when you go to an event in North or South Carolina are unbelievable, and even though I have to squeeze into my dressage pants afterwards, I don’t regret it! I try to bring a lot of fruits and nuts to the barn so that I’m not tempted to eat another egg-sausage-cheese-oh-my-god on a croissant. It only sometimes works.
KW: Can you share a recipe of yours with our readers that’s great for time pressed equestrians?
KS: Grilled peaches with pecans and vanilla ice cream. The perfect summer and fall dessert! Take some peaches, halve and pit them. Pour some maple syrup onto a plate, and plop the peaches face down in the syrup for a few minutes. If you’re using a grill, wait until it’s medium low heat, and if you’re using a stove top to sear the peaches, put that on medium low. Butter the cooking surface so that your peaches don’t shrivel up. Place the peaches face down on the cooking surface and leave them there 5-10 minutes. They should come up with with a light brown sear and be warm all the way through. Brush them with maple syrup again and throw them into a bowl with some vanilla ice cream. Top with pecans and discover the delights of warm fruit and cold ice cream!
Dinner party in the evening after a full day of riding? Ain't no thing for Kate.

Dinner party in the evening after a full day of riding? Ain’t no thing for Kate.

KW: Any special words to live by? 
KS: Everything in moderation, especially when experimenting. When it comes to horses or cooking, if you’re trying something new, add just a dash at first. I’ve come up with some of my best recipes by adding a little here, a little there. I’ve also been able to figure out some very tough horses by trying new approaches with quiet and slight changes.
Note: Kate was interviewed for the Stable Scoop Radio Show. There we tackled more food subjects and just how much of a role food plays in her life outside of horses.
Well there you have it folks. Another interesting and informative interview with an affluent horse woman who has some pretty neat food ties. You just never know who is starring as a chef de cuisine outside of their breeches! Until next time.
To full plates and eating your tarte out.

About the writer: Author Kat Wojtylak is a horse enthusiast turned food blogger. She maintains a day job in the horse world handling marketing and brand support to various companies, while enjoying her evenings and weekends writing recipes and blogging all about her culinary experiences. Visit her blog at EatYourTarteOut.com or email her at tartechic@eatyourtarteout.com.

A World of Riders: Bringing Student Rider Nations Cup Back to the United States

September 27, 2013 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

By: Kate McManis

It happens every four years; the torch is lit, the rings are raised, and the games begin. It is a dream of almost every athlete to represent his or her nation in a world competition and it is an experience and honor that can never be forgotten. Though not yet an Olympian myself (still keeping my fingers crossed), I have been lucky enough to represent the United States of America three times at Student Rider Nations Cup (SNRC) competitions. They were all three amazing events I will never forget.

In my final year at Virginia Intermont College, I filled a last minute need for a third American on the riding team for a competition in Romania. I packed my bags, met my teammates in the airport, and flew over the Atlantic to Transylvania. Upon landing, we shuttled with the German team to the show grounds where we were enthusiastically welcomed by student riders from Ireland, Switzerland, Spain, Romania, and more. Such was the beginning of many friendships I still maintain today. The next three days were a whirlwind of dressage, show jumping, city touring, rural Transylvania pond swimming, and the whole weekend culminated with me standing on a podium and receiving a bronze award in the name of my nation. The experience was incredible. I have participated twice again since in Spain and in Germany. Now, I would like to bring this special event back to America.

The organization through which SNRC’s are managed is the Association Internationale de Estudiant Cavaliers (AIEC). It is a non-profit organization focused on providing student riders the opportunity to experience international competition, to encourage multi-cultural interaction and camaraderie, and to do all of this at a minimum expense to the student competitor. The American Student Rider Organization (ASRO) is the non-profit American branch that organizes all participation from the United States. We have now proudly sent riders to Germany, Spain, Belgium, Ireland, Romania, Italy, even South Korea, but it has been ten years since we hosted our European and Asian friends. With a little help, that could soon change.

Thanks to the very generous support of Equestrian Sport Productions, LLC, the ASRO now has a facility to offer to host the AIEC 2014 World Finals in Wellington, FL. Already an international winter destination, Wellington is an exciting location to offer to our student riders. We want to present and promote American equine competition and production and hope to draw large numbers of spectators and public participation. But we cannot produce such an event without additional help from our equine community.

At this time, the ASRO is looking to raise approximately $45,000, which will provide all our participants, competitors, and organizers with necessary food and accommodations as well as cover the expenses of FEI approved judges, awards, programs, and evening events. More information for possible supporters or future competitors can be found on our websites or feel free to contact me directly at the addresses listed below. Any and all participation is greatly appreciated and all donations are tax deductible. Hosting an event like this directly affects the lives of countless students from nations across the world. Please consider joining us and becoming a part of this next great experience.

 

Kate McManis

American Student Rider Organization

Secretary and Competitor

(724) 613 2776    americanstudentriders@gmail.com

 

ASRO website: http://studentridersusa.webs.com/

AIEC website: http://www.aiecworld.com/

AIEC statues: http://www.aiecworld.com/bram/doc/AIEC_STATUTES.pdf

East-Man Feeds Inks Commitment as Alltech Official Partner

February 27, 2013 By: janwest Category: What's Happenin'

[WINNIPEG, Manitoba] – East-Man Feeds has become an Alltech Official Partner of the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2014 in Normandy.

 

 

This partnership provides East-Man Feeds a wide range of partner benefits including exclusive marketing rights. They will activate a number of marketing and promotional campaigns through Alltech’s LIFEFORCERange, giving their customers throughout Western Canada the opportunity to be involved in the excitement of the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2014 in Normandy.

 

 

“East-Man Feeds is delighted to be an Alltech Canadian Official Partner for the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2014 in Normandy.  We are looking forward to increasing our support to the equestrian world and aligning our brand with such a prestigious event,” said Mark Peters, sales and marketing manager, East-Man Feeds.

 

 

“We look forward to an exciting partnership with East-Man Feeds on the world’s most prestigious equestrian event,” said Orla McAleer, European marketing manager at Alltech. “They join more than 28 global partners who have united in a collaborative effort to promote optimal animal health and nutrition through the Games.”

 

 

“Alltech and East-Man Feeds have a long standing history of serving the agricultural community in Western Canada. We are thrilled to share in the pride of the Games in Normandy, a rich agricultural area, and to open it up to the farming community internationally,” said Ty Yeast, managing director of Alltech Canada.

 

(pictured left to right) Orla McAleer, European marketing manager with Mark Peters, East-Man Feeds sales and marketing manager, and Ty Yeast, Alltech’s Canadian managing director, celebrating East-Man Feeds’ Alltech Official Partnership of the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™  2014 in Normandy.

(pictured left to right) Orla McAleer, European marketing manager with Mark Peters, East-Man Feeds sales and marketing manager, and Ty Yeast, Alltech’s Canadian managing director, celebrating East-Man Feeds’ Alltech Official Partnership of the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2014 in Normandy.

 

The Alltech Official Partner Program is a strategic sales and marketing partnership with leading horse feed and animal and health nutrition companies throughout the world. It enables these global partners to differentiate their feed with the Alltech Equine Advantage and also provides them with the right to use Alltech Official Partner brand marks linked to the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2014 in Normandy. This exclusive program allows partners and their customers to share in the excitement of the world’s most celebrated equestrian championships.

 

 

About Alltech:

Founded in 1980 by Dr. Pearse Lyons, Alltech improves the health and performance of animals, plants and people through natural nutrition and scientific innovation. With more than 3000 employees in 128 countries, the company has developed a strong regional presence in Europe, North America, Latin America, the Middle-East, Africa and Asia. For further information, visit www.alltech.com. For media assets, visit www.alltech.com/press.

Alltech is the proud title sponsor of the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2014 in Normandy. For more information about these prestigious global championships, visit www.alltechfeiweg2014-normandy.com.

 

 

 About East-Man Feeds:

Founded in 1970 by Peter H. Friesen and family primarily as a poultry and swine feed dealer, East-Man Feeds has grown to seven locations in Western Canada and is an internationally known feed dealer and valued nutrition partner in the species sectors of swine, poultry, dairy, beef and equine.  Alltech has recently joined forces with East-Man Feeds to continue to better serve the agriculture industry in Canada.  Based in Winnipeg, Canada, East-Man Feeds has been in business for more than 40 years and employs over 140 people.